Tag Archives: Washington Concert Opera

The Washington Concert Opera at 30

Angela Meade, Vivica Genaux, Michele Angelini, Anthony Walker, Javier Arrey and Jonas Hacker at the Washington Concert Opera 30th Anniversary Concert. Photo by Don Lassell.

Angela Meade, Vivica Genaux, Michele Angelini, Antony Walker, Javier Arrey and Jonas Hacker at the Washington Concert Opera 30th Anniversary Concert. Photo by Don Lassell.

               The 30th anniversary concert of the Washington Concert Opera was delightful, from beginning to end. It gave substantial time in the spotlight to a vivid young bel canto tenor, Michele Angelini, and a powerful soprano with a large and enthusiastic following, Angela Meade. Also on the roster for this two-hour program of Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini: mezzo-soprano Vivica Genaux, baritone Javier Arrey and the young tenor Jonas Hacker. The WCO’s music director, Antony Walker, now in his 15th season, conducted.

               Seasons like the current on in Washington make you appreciate the essential niche WCO fills. After a world-class Ring Cycle last year, the Washington National Opera isn’t offering much for serious opera lovers this time around. Its programming reflects the larger trend in the opera world, which increasingly throws its energies into the production of new works rather than the loving revival of rarities. New work is all to the good, but the dwindling of interesting historical repertoire is sad. The future, it seems, may consist of world premieres, plus “Carmen,” “Boheme” and “Traviata.”

               Sunday night’s selections were well chosen. The overture, from Rossini’s “La gazza ladra,” was scrappy but vigorous, and thank heavens it wasn’t the overture from “La forza del destino,” which has become seemingly obligatory at such events. Angelini’s opening aria, “Ah! Mes amis,” with its infamous high C’s was effortless, the high notes light and chirpy, but clear and on pitch and without a hint of strain. Angelini also made a strong case for hearing more of Boieldieu’s “La dame blanche.” I remember discovering it years ago on a recording with Rockwell Blake in the role of Georges, but not much liking the timbre Blake brought to the part. Angelini, however, makes Georges’ aria “Viens, gentille dame” a virtuoso showpiece of legato connections, sung with a comfortable, fluent, supported sound; and his pianissimo reprise of the melody at the end was dramatically spot on. Angelini also sang the single most impressive aria of the evening, “Intesi, ah! tutto intesi” from Rossini’s “Il turco in Italia.” He was thoroughly warmed up, entirely at ease, his coloratura fleet and flawless, and Rossini’s grand superfluity of notes were all perfectly packaged rhythmically and expressively.

               Angela Meade added vocal heft in the Act II Finale from Bellini’s “Il Pirata” and selections from Donizetti’s “Lucrezia Borgia,” including the finale with Angelini as her hapless, horrified son. Meade’s bel canto is a different order of singing, weightier, vocally rounder, and more dependent on the later 19th century vocal thrills (floated top notes, sudden changes in dynamics, and the occasional display of oceanic force) than the coloratura bravura of Rossini. I found her strongest in the concluding scene from “Lucrezia Borgia,” perhaps because she created more of a sense of character, and tailored her singing, both musically and dramatically, to the presence of Angelini (and his performance in this scene was also one of his best moments of the evening, adding a greater sense of his full portfolio of stage skills).

               Vivica Genaux sang an impressive aria from Rossini’s “Maometto II” (“Non temer: d’un basso affetto”), with low tones that remind one of the particularly masculine, slightly nasal sound of Marilyn Horne in Rossini pants roles. Genaux was strongest in another duet from “Lucrezia Borgia,” again with Angelini.

                The discovery of the evening was the young tenor Jonas Hacker, currently studying in Philadelphia. Hacker sang the tenor line of the beloved male duet from Bizet’s “Les pecheurs de perles” with Arrey taking the baritone part. This is a chestnut, but was included on a bel canto program because it was sung at the first WCO performance of the Bizet opera in 1987. Hacker has an attractive voice, a steady technique and a flair for the simple elegant line. He began with an expository, narrative approach, and the duet unfolded as effective story telling rather than mere melodic indulgence. It was a short introduction to a young singer, but one that inspires hope of great things.

 

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Mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey returns to Washington Concert Opera

               In the summer of 1965, the young Luciano Pavarotti went on tour in Australia with Joan Sutherland. He credited that time with the great soprano for some of the musical lessons essential to building his career. On Friday night, mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey shared the stage with a young baritone and tenor, outclassing them both, yet also elevating their performance. Lindsey sang the title role of Donizetti’s “La Favorite” with the Washington Concert Opera, and was just as impressive and just as rapturously received as she when she appeared as Romeo in Bellini’s “I Capuleti e i Montecchi” in September 2014. But it was her larger impact on the whole performance that was most impressive. 

                    Lindsey’s voice isn’t huge, and there are moments during ensembles when you wish it was just a smidge larger. But it is distinctive, warm and burnished, and effortlessly deployed, with a tone so lovely that the ear searches it out, even when the orchestra (conducted by Antony Walker) threatened to overwhelm her. Lindsey legato and pianissimo are magnificent, and she shapes lines almost but never quite to the point of fussiness. This was a concert performance, so she wasn’t called on to act physically, yet she acts through the voice with absolute clarity and devastating effect. She was the focus of the evening, but when singing together with the tenor Randall Bills (as Fernand) or baritone Javier Arrey (as King Alphonse), she was also a spur to her partners, drawing out more confidence, more detail and more attention to nuance from both singers. This isn’t to sleight either of the men, who are promising artists; but rather like the young Pavarotti, they were both susceptible to the improving inspiration of singing with a more fully-fledged companion.

               After the performance, I spent a little time with a few of the recordings of “La Favorita” in my collection, including the 1974 Pavarotti-Cossotto and a live 1949 performance with Simionato and Di Stefano from Mexico City. Both are the Italian version, and the latter is Italian through and through, in style and spirit, with Simionato and Di Stefano snatching at the notes with a blood-curdling ferocity that wasn’t on display in the French version heard on Friday. I spent a lot of time with the Pavarotti-Cossotto discs a year ago while researching a story on the young Pavarotti for Gramophone, and I love them. But on return, and after hearing the WCO’s exciting performance, I found their studio efforts a little too clean, contained and packaged. There were plenty of small flaws in Friday’s live performance, but the effect was fully theatrical and entirely engaging.

               The French “Favorite”is the original opera Donizetti cobbled together for the Paris Opera in 1840. It is generally considered superior to its Italian cousin (“the version in the composer’s native tongue is corrupt, with many of the very particular stylistic choices and refinements of the French original coarsened in a variety of ways…” writes one critic), but it’s still a rarity compared to “La Favorita.” The Washington Concert Opera performance did indeed suggest a more refined and subtle work than the one Simionato and Di Stefano devoured in Mexico City, with Walker’s conducting and Lindsey’s singing significant contributing factors. The chorus was in fine form, as was bass John Relyea as Balthazar and soprano Joelle Harvey as Ines.

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Bellini at the Washington Concert Opera

WCO_DonLassell-4718               Tonight was the first time I’ve heard the extraordinary mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey, and it was thrilling. Lindsey sang Romeo in the Washington Concert Opera’s performance of Bellini’s “I Capuleti e i Montecchi,” at Lisner Auditorium. The entire cast was strong, with soprano Nicole Cabell as Giulietta and tenor David Portillo as Tebaldo. But Lindsey was the stand out, thoroughly satisfying, both musically and dramatically, and in the deeper, integrated, holistic way which suggests the presence of a really great artist. Her range of vocal expression, her control of dynamics, her effortless, smooth line, her breathing, and her freakishly cool, commanding stage presence made it impossible not to pay complete and absolute attention every moment she was onstage. I can’t wait to hear her again, and again and again.

               Bellini’s Romeo isn’t quite Shakespeare’s. Felice Romano’s libretto was ultimately derived from the same Italian sources that had inspired Shakespeare, but isn’t a direct adaptation of the English play. Still, many of the characters are the same, though they relate very differently to each other. Tebaldo, a tenor, isn’t quite the impetuous brute he is in Shakespeare, but rather a more conflicted, decent character who aims at our sympathy in the classic manner of an Italian tenor. Some of Tybalt’s more thuggish qualities have devolved onto Romeo in Romano’s libretto, though Bellini’s music softens them. Still, anyone expecting a dreamy, romantic Romeo may find the operatic version a little unnerving.        

               Lindsey made no effort to temper his dark side, though by the end, he was an entirely endearing figure, desperate and tragic, especially at the moment when he realizes that Giulietta is alive, and his suicide was unnecessary (another disconcerting difference from the Shakespeare). This last scene of the opera, and Lindsey’s musical depiction of his death, were stunningly good.

               Although her expressive style is more overtly emotional, Cabell was ultimately a colder presence, a musically polished Giulietta, and an often passionately sung one, but not quite a full character. Still, her voice blended nicely with Lindsey’s, and even though Cabell was filling in for Olga Peretyatko (who was indisposed), she and Lindsey seemed perfectly rehearsed and alert to each other’s nuance and intentions. Portillo was a happy surprise too, a bright tenor with a charismatic sense of line. As Capellio—much more of a dark-hatted villain than the Shakespearean Capulet—bass Jeffrey Beruan displayed a fine instrument, robust, dark and well suited to the role.

                  There were fine solo passages from the orchestra as well, especially the French horn, clarinet and cello. Antony Walker, artistic director, conducted a seamless and sensible reading, alive to the drama and sensitive to the soloists.

Photo Credit: Don Lassell, courtesy Washington Concert Opera

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