Tag Archives: Nicole Cabell

Bellini at the Washington Concert Opera

WCO_DonLassell-4718               Tonight was the first time I’ve heard the extraordinary mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey, and it was thrilling. Lindsey sang Romeo in the Washington Concert Opera’s performance of Bellini’s “I Capuleti e i Montecchi,” at Lisner Auditorium. The entire cast was strong, with soprano Nicole Cabell as Giulietta and tenor David Portillo as Tebaldo. But Lindsey was the stand out, thoroughly satisfying, both musically and dramatically, and in the deeper, integrated, holistic way which suggests the presence of a really great artist. Her range of vocal expression, her control of dynamics, her effortless, smooth line, her breathing, and her freakishly cool, commanding stage presence made it impossible not to pay complete and absolute attention every moment she was onstage. I can’t wait to hear her again, and again and again.

               Bellini’s Romeo isn’t quite Shakespeare’s. Felice Romano’s libretto was ultimately derived from the same Italian sources that had inspired Shakespeare, but isn’t a direct adaptation of the English play. Still, many of the characters are the same, though they relate very differently to each other. Tebaldo, a tenor, isn’t quite the impetuous brute he is in Shakespeare, but rather a more conflicted, decent character who aims at our sympathy in the classic manner of an Italian tenor. Some of Tybalt’s more thuggish qualities have devolved onto Romeo in Romano’s libretto, though Bellini’s music softens them. Still, anyone expecting a dreamy, romantic Romeo may find the operatic version a little unnerving.        

               Lindsey made no effort to temper his dark side, though by the end, he was an entirely endearing figure, desperate and tragic, especially at the moment when he realizes that Giulietta is alive, and his suicide was unnecessary (another disconcerting difference from the Shakespeare). This last scene of the opera, and Lindsey’s musical depiction of his death, were stunningly good.

               Although her expressive style is more overtly emotional, Cabell was ultimately a colder presence, a musically polished Giulietta, and an often passionately sung one, but not quite a full character. Still, her voice blended nicely with Lindsey’s, and even though Cabell was filling in for Olga Peretyatko (who was indisposed), she and Lindsey seemed perfectly rehearsed and alert to each other’s nuance and intentions. Portillo was a happy surprise too, a bright tenor with a charismatic sense of line. As Capellio—much more of a dark-hatted villain than the Shakespearean Capulet—bass Jeffrey Beruan displayed a fine instrument, robust, dark and well suited to the role.

                  There were fine solo passages from the orchestra as well, especially the French horn, clarinet and cello. Antony Walker, artistic director, conducted a seamless and sensible reading, alive to the drama and sensitive to the soloists.

Photo Credit: Don Lassell, courtesy Washington Concert Opera
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